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What was the first science fiction story to contain a robot ***** doll?   

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admin you
@admin · Posted 25 Nov. 2020

What was the first science fiction story to contain a robot ***** doll?


admin you
@admin · Posted 25 Nov. 2020

In 1927, Fritz Lang, in his futuristic film Metropolis, probably for the first time in the history of cinema, gave the role of femme fatale to a robot: Maschinenmensch, a robot replica of Maria, the film’s leading lady. The human side of robot Maria is so perfect that, managing to substitute the original without any trouble, she incites a worker uprising against the bosses.

Almost a century since Metropolis, the dizzying pace of technological advances forces us to constantly rethink where the line is drawn separating fiction from reality. Today, robot Maria is ready to take the leap over into the real world. We are looking at the production of a new type of robot with a human appearance, life-sized and with a certain kind of brain.

There is no shortage of futurologists who maintain that, within a matter of decades, machines could replace humans in a still undetermined number of relationships, such as care companionship, friendship or ***** relations (which are currently confined to two or more beings from our own species).

A robot as a romantic partner?

The possibility of acquiring intelligent robots as companions is, in principle, set to become a reality this very year. Several companies from the ***** technology sector, in various parts of the world, are working on the launch, which they say is ‘imminent’, of new life-like ***** dolls equipped with artificial intelligence, capable of discussing literature, selecting romantic music to create the right ambiance, or even telling a joke, although, in line with demand, they primarily react to all forms of ***** urges.

The current leader in the hyper-realistic ***** doll sector is the Real Doll by Abyss Creations. This US company with 20 years of experience, based in San Marcos, California, is working to equip its prototype, Harmony, with artificial intelligence. The goal of its inventor, Matt McMullen, is for his robots to interact with users as naturally as possible, learning, amongst other things, details about their lives.

But McMullen is not the only one. The robot women designed in Catalonia, Spain by Sergi Santos, a nanotechnology and computer engineering expert, can interact in family or romantic mode, although (like Harmony) they are chiefly designed to have ***** relations, and to feel an *****. In this case, the robots could serve as a tool for realising all types of fantasies.

The male versions of these robots, which Santos is also planning to release, are further behind in the development stage, both because the demand for them is lower and owing to the weight factor: the materials currently used to produce them are “too heavy” for a female public.

Is the development of ***** robots a mere anecdote? Not for the Foundation for Responsible Robotics (FRR), based in the Netherlands. In a recent publication, it warns of the implications of the production and use of robots made to look like children. “We need clarification on policies on child ***** robots at the international level sooner rather than later, about whether they should be sold legally and what sort of ownership and use should be permissible,” insist the report’s authors.


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